Archive for May 2007

RAP Shell Assembly Techniques

(* RAP stands for Rapid Assembly Plastic)

We have had a high degree of success using RAP Shells. Assembly times are a small fraction of what is required for Italian style construction and nicely symmetric breaks can be achieved when the proper techniques are employed. This article is a summary of successful methods used by us and reported to us by others. However, no attempt will be made to give detailed step by step instructions, nor will the information in our “Guide-lines for Assembling RAP Shells” [Copy follows.] be repeated here. While the information presented below is particularly relevant for RAP Shell assembly, much also applies to assembling other types of plastic and plastic/paper shells as well. To assist those readers who may not be familiar with RAP Shells, two figures have been included. Figure 1 shows the various RAP Shell components and how they are assembled, and Figure 2 shows a typically completed RAP Shell.


Ref: Selected Pyrotechnic Publication of K.L. and B.J Kosanke, Part 1, (1981-1989), pp 94-97
(K1_94)
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An Evaluation of “Pyro-Flake” Titanium for Use in Fireworks

Several months ago, our company was approached by the Suisman Titanium Corporation. They told us that they were considering introducing some new titanium products specifically intended for the fireworks trade, and that their materials would be priced below that of titanium sponge. They asked whether we would perform an evaluation of their “Pyro-Flake” titanium and make recommendations concerning the introduction of their products to the fireworks trade. We performed that study, and one of our recommendations was that a condensed report of our study be published. This article is that condensed report and was in part subsidized by Suisman Titanium. However, Suisman Titanium has asked us to be completely candid, and they have not exerted any editorial control over the content of this article.


Ref: Selected Pyrotechnic Publication of K.L. and B.J Kosanke, Part 1, (1981-1989), pp 89-93
(K1_89)
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Economics of Plastic Shell Construction

Introduction: One hears a number of reasons why some manufacturers are reluctant to seriously consider the use of plastic shells. Among these are a feeling that it would somehow represent a betrayal of tradition and aesthetic values; the problem of long lasting debris; that it requires the learning and application of significantly different techniques, which translates into development costs. I understand all of these reactions quite well; I felt and expressed them myself in the past. It was a slow and sometimes trying metamorphosis from the position I expressed in the past to the one I now take.


Ref: Selected Pyrotechnic Publication of K.L. and B.J Kosanke, Part 1, (1981-1989), pp 85-88
(K1_85)
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HDPE Mortars for Electrically Fired Displays

When firing by hand, the problems of steel mortars can easily be over-looked. However, even for relatively small electrically fired displays, steel mortars and the usual alternatives (paper and PVC mortars) have limitations that are difficult to cope with. Steel mortars are heavy; when several hundred may be needed for a show, their weight can easily exceed 5000 pounds. This may necessitate the use of a large truck and must certainly be seen as undesirable by the crew that will need to handle them several times. Service life is long, but high initial cost (about $1/pound) is another problem. Finally, even though steel mortars are quite strong, there is the possibility that a shell detonation may cause the production of dangerous mortar debris.


Ref: Selected Pyrotechnic Publication of K.L. and B.J Kosanke, Part 1, (1981-1989), pp 80-84
(K1_80)
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Sizzling Colored Comets

The sizzling colored comets described in this article have brilliantly colored heads, have short white tails and produce a sound much like frying bacon. They are very simple modifications of standard potassium perchlorate color compositions, are inexpensive and are relatively easy to make. These sizzling colored comets are suitable for use as comet stars in shells or for use as single large comets.


Ref: Selected Pyrotechnic Publication of K.L. and B.J Kosanke, Part 1, (1981-1989), pp 79-79
(K1_79)


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Electrical Firing of Musically Choreographed Aerial Fireworks Displays

1.0 Introduction: There are a number of reasons why one might be reluctant to consider abandoning traditional show firing methods in favor of performing electrically fired shows, especially those choreographed to a musical program. One reason is the perceived high cost of performing such shows. Other reasons might be a lack of detailed knowledge about performing such displays or the lack of a full appreciation of the benefits to be gained. It is the purpose of this paper to present detailed information concerning the staging of electrically fired aerial displays choreographed to music. However, in the process we hope to show how high initial costs can be offset in a relatively short time by increased profit. Also we hope it will become clearer that there are other benefits to be gained.


Ref: Selected Pyrotechnic Publication of K.L. and B.J Kosanke, Part 1, (1981-1989), pp 51-78
(K1_51)
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An Idea for Small Shows

One problem commonly faced by smaller display operators is the sponsor of an inexpensive show ($1000 to $5000) who wants a longer show than he has money for. The obvious solution, slowing down the firing, is usually a poor choice. Some slowing may be practical, but often the sponsor of these small shows wants about twice as much show as they have money. If you slow things down that much, you are guaranteed to disappoint the audience.


Ref: Selected Pyrotechnic Publication of K.L. and B.J Kosanke, Part 1, (1981-1989), pp 49-50
(K1_49)
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The Physics, Chemistry and Perception of Colored Flames, Part 2

4.0 The Chemistry of Colored Flames

4.1 A Summary of General Chemistry for Colored Flame Production

This paper is intended to benefit readers who do not enjoy a thorough understanding of chemistry. Thus, before dealing with more advanced topics, a discussion of some aspects of general chemistry may be of benefit. Any reader with an understanding of chemical symbols and the Periodic Table, chemical formulas and IUPAC nomenclature, chemical equations, the idea of reversibility and Le Châtelier’s Principle, stoichiometry and mole weights should skip ahead to section 4.2.


Ref: Selected Pyrotechnic Publication of K.L. and B.J Kosanke, Part 1, (1981-1989), pp 30-48
(K1_30)
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Festival Ball Comets

Festival ball comets are inexpensive, easy to assemble and produce a nice effect. Before discussing their construction, let me acknowledge that, as far as I know, the basic idea for this firework originated with Bob Winokur.

The device consists of a festival ball shell with comet composition coating the fuse end of the shell. Festival balls are small Class “C” aerial shells, about 1-3/4" in diameter and are usually painted red in color. Unlifted, they cost about $20.00 per hundred. Kits of 12 lifted shells with a mortar are available for five or six dollars. The small shells have stars of any of several colors and are a fairly effective firework for the price.


Ref: Selected Pyrotechnic Publication of K.L. and B.J Kosanke, Part 1, (1981-1989), pp 29-29
(K1_29)
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Taming Triangle Diagrams

ABSTRACT: A “dialogue” is presented wherein the author demystifies the triangle diagram or trigonometrical graph and shows how it can be a means of discovering hidden relationships between the components of a pyrotechnic composition, finding optimum formulations for a pyrotechnic system, and for summarizing the results of pyrotechnic experiments.


Ref: Selected Pyrotechnic Publication of K.L. and B.J Kosanke, Part 1, (1981-1989), pp 22-28
(K1_22)
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